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Wednesday, May 20, 2020 | History

3 edition of Calf survival of woodland caribou in a multi-predator ecosystem found in the catalog.

Calf survival of woodland caribou in a multi-predator ecosystem

Calf survival of woodland caribou in a multi-predator ecosystem

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Published by Wildlife Society in [Bethesda, MD?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Woodland caribou -- British Columbia,
  • Predation (Biology) -- British Columbia,
  • Parturition grounds -- British Columbia,
  • Reindeer -- British Columbia,
  • Ecosystem,
  • Predatory Behavior -- British Columbia

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesJournal of wildlife management. Supplement.
    StatementDavid D. Gustine ... [et al.]
    SeriesWildlife monographs -- no. 165.
    ContributionsGustine, David D.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL737.U55 C35 2006
    The Physical Object
    Pagination32 p. :
    Number of Pages32
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16359322M
    OCLC/WorldCa76951602

    Close monitoring of 50 newborn woodland caribou calves for their first two months of life provides some insights into caribou behaviour and the factors that influence calf survival. Northern ecotype caribou when bearing young need to balance avoiding predators with accessing nutritious vegetation. CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): ABSTRACT. Effects on woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) of low-level military jet training at Canadian Forces Base- Goose Bay (Labrador) were studied during the training seasons. Calf survival was periodically monitored during and in a sample of 15 females wearing satellite-tracked.

    Abstract. Context: Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) populations have declined across most of North (Canis lupus) predation on adults is partially responsible for declines; however, caribou declines also can be attributed to low calf and invading coyotes (C. latrans) may contribute to mortality of : We assessed wolf and coyote food habits and Cited by: Calving strategies and calf survival of woodland caribou in a multi-predator ecosystem in northern British Columbia. Comparison of seasonal habitat selection between threatened woodland caribou ecotypes in central British Columbia Rangifer Special Issue No.

      Learn about the woodland caribou in Canada's boreal forest. Forest management practices consider the specific needs of different Woodland Caribou populations across .   Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) populations are declining worldwide, and predation is considered their most important limiting factor in North u are known to reduce predation risk by spacing themselves away from predators and alternative prey. This strategy is now compromised by forestry activities that reduce the amount of suitable caribou habitat and trigger an Cited by:


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Calf survival of woodland caribou in a multi-predator ecosystem Download PDF EPUB FB2

Large‐scale characteristics predicted survival of woodland caribou neonates better in summer than in the calving season, probably in part because of the unexpected role of wolverines (Gulo gulo) as the main predator of woodland caribou calves during calving.

Gray wolves were the main cause of mortality during the by: in calf mortality related to that variation, illustrates the importance of behavioral plasticity as a life-history strategy for woodland caribou. Wildlife Monographs 1–32 KEY WORDS calving, GIS, mortality, NDVI, predation risk, Rangifer tarandus caribou, remote sensing, scale, survival, trade-off, woodland caribou.

Calf survival of woodland caribou in a multi-predator ecosystem. [David D Gustine; Katherine L Parker; Roberta J Lay; Michael Patrick Gillingham; Douglas C Heard; Wildlife Society,;] -- "The proximate role of predation in limiting caribou (Rangifer tarandus) populations is well documented, but the long-term effects of predation pressure on selection of calving areas and the.

Calf survival of woodland caribou in a multi-predator ecosystem / Author: David D. Gustine [et al.] Publication info: [Bethesda, Md.]: Wildlife Society, c Request PDF | Calf Survival of Woodland Caribou in a Multi-Predator Ecosystem | The proximate role of predation in limiting caribou (Rangifer tarandus) populations is well documented, but the long.

Large-scale characteristics predicted survival of woodland caribou neonates better in summer than in the calving season, probably in part because of the unexpected role of wolverines (Gulo gulo) as the main predator of woodland caribou calves during calving.

Gray wolves File Size: KB. Woodland caribou calf mortality in Newfoundland: insights into the role of climate, predation and population density over three decades of study Article (PDF Available) in Population Ecology 58(1.

It is possible that caribou with calves perceive roads as a greater threat than caribou without calves or that individual variation in habitat selection and nonrandom calf survival explain the trend.

During the calving season, caribou tend to spread out across the landscape, avoiding conspecifics (Bergerud & Page, ) and predatory species Cited by: 3.

Caribou cows typically produce a single calf each spring, seeking traditional calving grounds in remote, isolated areas. When commercial operations compromise these areas, calf survival is affected. Calf survival rates are percent, significantly reducing the herd.

PLASTICITY IN SELECTION STRATEGIES OF WOODLAND CARIBOU (RANGIFER TARANDUS CARIBOU) DURING WINTER AND CALVING by Calf survival through the first 2 months of life ranged from 54% in to 79% in iii WOODLAND CARIBOU IN A MULTI-PREDATOR ECOSYSTEM IN.

Calf survival of woodland caribou in a multi-predator ecosystem. Wildlife Monographs Hern, B.J. S.N. Luttich, M. Crete and M.B. Berger. Survival of radio-collared caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) from the George River herd, Nouveau-Quebec-Labrador.

Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou), wolves (Canis lupus), and moose (Alces alces) were radio-collared and monitored in two areas of southeastern British Columbia to determine predator–prey hout the year, wolves and moose used similar areas and habitats, and moose were the primary prey of wolves. In winter most caribou used high-elevation habitats and were spatially Cited by: This project will identify caribou calving habitat and relate calf survival to predation risk and anthropogenic disturbance.

This project addresses important knowledge gaps identified by PTAC: boreal woodland caribou calving habitat selection and wildlife (including predator) use of anthropogenic features associated with oil and gas developments.

Gustine et al. Calf Survival of Woodland Caribou in a Multi-Predator Ecosystem. Wildlife Monographs Click here to download. LITERATURE: > The BCRP website literature section (with pdf versions of theses) > Acrobat Reader (pdf) list of the ACC literature. CARIBOU LITERATURE CITATION DATABASE.

Contour plot showing annual population growth rates (λ represented as lines) resulting from two-dimensional combinations of adult female survival and calf:cow ratios for woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) and the relative annual mean vital rates for each of 14 woodland caribou populations in Alberta from to Cited by:   Analysis of movement patterns of female woodland caribou using the population‐level method to infer parturition and offspring survival status.

In this example, the female is predicted to have calved in the middle of May with the calf lost approximately 1 week by: 1. Reintroduction of North American Elk, Moose, & Caribou Into Wisconsin; Linda R. Parker – Bureau of Research, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, August 2.

Calf Survival of Woodland Caribou in a Multi-Predator Ecosystem ; Gustine, David Parker, Katherine; Lay, Roberta; Gillingham, Michael; Heard, Douglas; et al. Wildlife Monographs – A publication of The Wildlife Society. The Wildlife Society. Barlow Place, Suite Bethesda, MD Phone: () We tested the influences of population size, climate, calf weight and sex on survival to 6 months of age of radio-collared caribou calves over three decades, spanning periods of population growth (–) and decline (–) in Newfoundland, by: Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou), Boreal Population (herein referred to as boreal caribou), are formally listed as Threatened under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA).

The Act requires the Minister of Environment to prepare a Recovery Strategy for the species that includes, to the extent possible and based upon the best available information, an of its Critical.

Climate had little influence on caribou calf survival. This is perhaps not surprising given that Newfoundland is a relatively mild climate for caribou and there are no over-winter predators of significance, i.e., caribou are not likely to die from extreme winter events and there are no wolves (Canis lupis) or other predators that hunt more efficiently as snow depth increases.Inferring parturition and neonate survival from movement patterns of female ungulates: a case study using woodland caribou Calf survival of woodland caribou in a multi-predator ecosystem.

Wildl. Monogr. ; – Hebblewhite M, Haydon DT. Distinguishing technology from biology: a critical review of the use of GPS telemetry data in Cited by: Gustine DD, Parker KL, Lay RJ, Gillingham MP, Heard DC () Calf survival of woodland caribou in a multi-predator ecosystem.

Wildlife Monographs 1–32 Cited by: